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Yellow Fever Vaccination & Related information

Proof of yellow fever vaccination is required to enter Kenya or Tanzania only if arriving from a yellow fever affected area. Kenya and Tanzania are yellow fever affected areas so arrival from Kenya into Tanzania requires proof of yellow fever vaccination. No other immunizations are required. The CDC recommends that all travelers to East Africa be up-to-date on vaccinations for measles/mumps/rubella (MMR), diphtheria/pertussis/tetanus (DPT), poliovirus, hepatitis A, hepatitis B, yellow fever and typhoid; however, you should consult with your personal physician.

Advice for All Destinations

The risks to health whilst travelling will vary between individuals and many issues need to be taken into account, e.g. activities abroad, length of stay and general health of the traveller. It is recommended that you consult with your General Practitioner or Practice Nurse 6-8 weeks in advance of travel. They will assess your particular health risks before recommending vaccines and /or antimalarial tablets. This is also a good opportunity to discuss important travel health issues including safe food and water, accidents, sun exposure and insect bites. Many of the problems experienced by travellers cannot be prevented by vaccinations and other preventive measures need to be taken.

Measles occurs worldwide and is common in developing countries. The pre-travel consultation is a good opportunity to check that you are immune, either by previous immunisation or natural measles infection.

Ensure you are fully insured for medical emergencies including repatriation. UK travellers visiting other European Union countries should also carry the European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) as it entitles travellers to reduced cost, sometimes free, medical treatment in most European countries. Online applications normally arrive within seven days. Applications may also be made by telephone on 0300 330 1350 or by post using the form which can be downloaded from the website.

For Travel Safety Advice you should visit the UK Foreign and Commonwealth Office website.

A worldwide list of clinics, run by members of the International Society of Travel Medicine is available on the ISTM website.

Immunisations

  • Confirm primary courses and boosters are up to date as recommended for life in Britain - including for example, vaccines required for occupational risk of exposure, lifestyle risks and underlying medical conditions.
  • Courses or boosters usually advised:   Diphtheria; Hepatitis A; Tetanus; Typhoid.
  • Other vaccines to consider:   Cholera; Hepatitis B; Meningococcal Meningitis; Rabies; Yellow Fever.
  • Yellow fever vaccination certificate required for travellers over 1 year of age arriving from countries with risk of yellow fever transmission and for travellers having transited more than 12 hours through the airport of a country with risk of yellow fever transmission. The certificate of yellow fever vaccination is valid for life in this country.

Notes on the diseases mentioned above

  • Choleraspread  through consumption of contaminated water and food. More common during floods and after natural disasters, in areas with very poor sanitation and lack of clean drinking water. It would be unusual for travellers to contract cholera if they take basic precautions with food and water and maintain a good standard of hygiene.

  • Diphtheriaspread  person to person through respiratory droplets. Risk is higher if mixing with locals in poor, overcrowded living conditions.

  • Hepatitis Aspread  through consuming contaminated food and water or person to person through the faecal-oral route. Risk is higher where personal hygiene and sanitation are poor.

  • Hepatitis Bspread  through infected blood and blood products, contaminated needles and medical instruments and sexual intercourse. Risk is higher for those at occupational risk, long stays or frequent travel, children (exposed through cuts and scratches) and individuals who may need, or request, surgical procedures abroad.

  • Meningococcal Meningitisspread  by droplet infection through close person to person contact. Meningococcal disease is found worldwide but epidemics may occur within this country, particularly during the dry season. Risk is higher for those mixing with locals for extended periods.

  • Rabiesspread  through the saliva of an infected animal, usually through a bite, scratch or lick on broken skin. Particularly dogs and related species, but also bats. Risk is higher for those going to remote areas (who may not be able to promptly access appropriate treatment in the event of a bite), long stays, those at higher risk of contact with animals and bats, and children. Even when pre-exposure vaccine has been received, urgent medical advice should be sought after any animal or bat bite.

  • Tetanusspread  through contamination of cuts, burns and wounds with tetanus spores. Spores are found in soil worldwide. A total of 5 doses of tetanus vaccine are recommended for life in the UK. Boosters are usually recommended in a country or situation where the correct treatment of an injury may not be readily available.

  • Typhoidspread  mainly through consumption of contaminated food and drink. Risk is higher where access to adequate sanitation and safe water is limited.

  • Yellow Feverspread  by the bite of an infected, day-biting mosquito. The disease is mainly found in rural areas but outbreaks in urban areas do occur. Vaccination is usually recommended for those who travel into risk areas. View yellow fever risk areas here. Some travellers may require vaccination for certificate purposes.

Malaria

Malaria is a serious and sometimes fatal disease transmitted by mosquitoes. You cannot be vaccinated against malaria.

Malaria precautions

Malaria Map
  • Malaria precautions are essential in all areas below 1800m, all year round.
  • Avoid mosquito bites by covering up with clothing such as long sleeves and long trousers especially after sunset, using insect repellents on exposed skin and, when necessary, sleeping under a mosquito net.
  • Check with your doctor or nurse about suitable antimalarial tablets.
  • Atovaquone/proguanil OR doxycycline OR mefloquine is usually recommended.
  • If you have been travelling in a malarious area and develop a fever seek medical attention promptly. Remember malaria can develop even up to one year after exposure.
  • If travelling to high risk malarious areas, remote from medical facilities, carrying emergency malaria standby treatment may be considered.


Other Health Risks


Altitude and Travel

This country has either areas with high altitude (2400m or more) or/and areas with very high altitude (3658m or more). Travellers who may go into areas of high altitude should take care to avoid ill effects of being at altitude including Acute Mountain Sickness, a potentially life-threatening condition.  For further information on Altitude Sickness for those planning to climb Mt. Kilimanjaro, visit our Altitude Sickness page.

Dengue Fever

A viral illness that is transmitted to humans by mosquito bites. The mosquito that spreads dengue bites during the day and is more common in urban areas. Symptoms include fever, headache, severe joint, bone and muscular pain - hence its other name 'breakbone fever'. There is no vaccine and prevention is through avoidance of mosquito bites.  For further information see Dengue Fever.

Schistosomiasis

A parasitic infection (also known as bilharzia) that is transmitted to humans through contact with fresh water. The parasite enters humans through the skin and prevention is dependant on avoidance of swimming, bathing or paddling in fresh water lakes and streams.  For further information see Schistosomiasis.


The United Republic of Tanzania is a nation in central East Africa bordered by Kenya and Uganda to the north, Rwanda, Burundi and the Democratic Republic of the Congo to the west, and Zambia, Malawi and Mozambique to the south. The country’s eastern borders lie on the Indian Ocean. 

The United Republic of Tanzania is a unitary republic composed of 26 mikoa (regions). The current head of state is President Jakaya Mrisho Kikwete, elected in 2005. Since 1996, the official capital of Tanzania has been Dodoma, where parliament and some government offices are located. Between independence and 1996 the major coastal city of Dar es Salaam had been the country’s political capital. Today Dar es Salaam remains the principal commercial city of Tanzania and the de-facto seat of most government institutions. It is the major seaport for the country and its landlocked neighbours. 
The name Tanzania is a portmanteau of Tanganyika and Zanzibar. The two states united in 1964 to form the United Republic of Tanganyika and Zanzibar, which later the same year was renamed the United Republic of Tanzania. 

PASSPORTS & VISA
All visitors to Tanzania require a return or onward ticket and a valid passport with an entry or re-entry visa, duly endorsed. Visas are not required for visitors from some Commonwealth countries and other specified countries. Visas can be obtained from any Tanzania Diplomatic Mission or Consulate abroad, and at main entry points including international airports, sea ports and border posts.

HEALTH 
Visitors originating from or transiting through countries endemic with cholera or yellow fever may need valid vaccination certificates, but it is not mandatory. Visitors are advised to take anti-malaria tablets and make use of mosquito nets and insect sprays where provided. Health insurance through your travel agent or any other agent is recommended.  

DEPARTURES 
An airport tax of US$ 30.00 is levied on all visitors departing the country by air. In many instances, this fee is included in your airline ticket. Visitors departing by air from Kenya must pay at the airport, however. Baggage is weighed at check-in counters and may be inspected by Custom officials. Airport departure tax for domestic flights is about US$ 6.00. All fees are subject to change. There is no departure tax when travelling by road.  

AIR TRAVEL 
Several international airlines operate in and out of Tanzania through Dar es Salaam and Kilimanjaro International Airports. Travel within the country is by the national airline, Air Tanzania, and by Precision Air, Regional Air, Air Excel, and ZanAir. 

OTHERS - LANGUAGE
The national language is Kiswahili but English is widely spoken and is the language of the tourist trade and other international businesses.

CLIMATE
The climate is tropical. The coastal areas are hot and humid with an average day temperature of 30 degrees centigrade. The central plateau is dry and arid with hot days and cool nights. In the northwest highlands around Arusha and Ngorongoro, the climate is temperate and cooler between June and September. The long rains are from March to May and the short rains fall between October and December. The hottest months are between October and February. 

TIME
Tanzania has only one time zone. Local time is GMT + 3 and Daylight Savings Time is not used.

ELECTRICITY
215 - 230 Volts, 50 Cycles AC

CURRENCY 
The unit of currency is the Tanzania Shilling (TShs) which is divided into 100 cents. Visitors can bring with them any amount of foreign currency but it is against the law to import or export Tanzania Currency. Foreign currency in cash or in travellers cheques may be exchanged at the commercial banks, authorised dealers, or at the bureau de changes operating at the international airports, major towns and border posts.